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Table of Contents

  1. Topic pack - Microeconomics - introduction
  2. 1.1 Competitive Markets: Demand and Supply
  3. 1.1 Competitive Markets: Demand and Supply - notes
  4. 1.1 Competitive markets - questions
  5. 1.1 Competitive markets - simulations and activities
  6. 1.2 Elasticities
  7. 1.2 Elasticities - notes
  8. Section 1.2 Elasticities - questions
  9. Section 1.2 Elasticities - simulations and activities
  10. 1.3 Government intervention
  11. 1.3 Government Intervention - notes
  12. 1.3 Government intervention - questions
  13. 1.3 Government intervention - simulations and activities
  14. 1.4 Market failure
  15. 1.4 Market failure - notes
    1. The meaning of externalities
    2. Types of externalities
    3. How do externalities affect allocative efficiency?
    4. Negative externalities of production
    5. Negative externalities of consumption
    6. The economic theory of traffic congestion
    7. Demerit goods
    8. Government responses - demerit goods
    9. Possible government responses to externalities
    10. Direct government provision
    11. Extension of property rights
    12. Taxes and subsidies
    13. Tradeable pollution rights
    14. Regulation, legislation and direct controls
    15. Positive externalities of production
    16. Positive externalities of consumption
    17. Merit goods
    18. Why might merit goods be underprovided by the market?
    19. Government responses - merit goods
    20. Public goods
    21. Common access resources & sustainability
    22. The tragedy of the Commons
    23. Common access resources in practice
    24. Sustainability
    25. Threats to Sustainability
    26. The threat to sustainability from the use of fossil fuels
    27. The threat to sustainability from poverty
    28. Government responses to threats to sustainability
    29. Cap and Trade Schemes
    30. Promoting Clean Technologies
    31. The 'dirty side' of cleaner technologies
    32. International responses to threats to sustainability
    33. Asymmetric information
    34. Abuse of monopoly power
    35. Inequality
  16. Section 1.4 Market failure - questions
  17. Section 1.4 Market failure - simulations and activities
  18. 1.5 Theory of the firm
  19. 1.5 Theory of the firm - notes (HL only)
  20. Section 1.5 Theory of the firm - questions
  21. Section 1.5 Theory of the firm - simulations and activities
  22. Print View

Threats to Sustainability

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The threat to sustainability comes from the unplanned and unregulated exploitation of the world's natural resources. The increase in globalisation, the drive for economic growth, population growth and development in technology has made the need for management of global common access resources more and more necessary, whether this is by governments or by local communities.

Clearly, there are already many examples of threats to sustainability from the depletion and destruction of common access resources, such as deforestation, soil erosion and the overfishing of oceans. These are compounded by the pursuit of economic growth by newly developing countries, and in less economically developed countries where high levels of poverty and poor regulation creates negative externalities through over-exploitation of land for agriculture.

The depletion of natural resources, such as fossil fuels and fishing resources, creates individual hardship and political instability and potentially threatens world peace. Resource depletion is accelerating and the economic growth of countries that ignore this trend will be eroded by higher commodity prices.


The Earth Summit 2012 on Sustainable Development - 'Rio+20'

Read the article Big summit seeks big idea. You can either read the article in the window below or you can follow the link above to read the article in a separate window.